Difference between revisions of "Ann Johnson"

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==See also==
 
==See also==
  
[[Women of Eureka]]  
+
[[Ballaarat New Cemetery]]
 +
 
 +
[[Women of Eureka]]
  
 
==Further Reading==
 
==Further Reading==
 +
Dorothy Wickham, Women in 'Ballarat' 1851-1871: A Case Study in Agency, PhD. School of Behavioural and Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Ballarat, March 2008.
 +
 +
Dorothy Wickham, Blood, Sweat and Tears: Women of Eureka in ''Journal of Australian Colonial History'', 10, No, 1, 2008, pp. 99-115.
 +
 +
Dorothy Wickham, ''Women of the Diggings: Ballarat 1854'', BHSPublishing, 2009.
 +
 +
http://www.eurekapedia.org/Blood,_Sweat_and_Tears:_Women_at_Eureka
 +
 +
Clare Wright, ''The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka'', Text Publishing, 2013.
  
 +
Dorothy Wickham, Not just a Pretty Face: Women on the Goldfields, in ''Pay Dirt: Ballarat & Other Gold Towns'', BHSPublishing, 2019, pp. 25-36.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Latest revision as of 10:20, 16 August 2020

Background

Goldfields Involvement, 1854

After the Eureka Stockade battle Ann Johnson dressed the diggers wounds.[1]

Post 1854 Experiences

Obituary

The death has taken place of Mrs Ann Johnson of Ballarat East. She assisted in dressing the wounds of diggers who were wounded in the fighting at the Eureka stockade. Her eldest daughter was born in a tent on the diggings. Mrs. Johnson was the oldest member of the Ballarat Town and City Mission. Two of her grandsons are fighting at the front, and one has returned home. [2]
Another of the Eureka pioneers, viz., Mrs Ann Johnson, passed away on Sunday at the residence of her daughter, Mrs Roberts, of Eureka st. The deceased has been a resident of Ballarat for 64 years. Her eldest daughter, Mrs Parnell, was born in a tent in the early days of the gold rush to Ballarat. The deceased assisted in bandaging the wounded at the fight at Eureka Stockade, and was the oldest member of the Town and City Mission, having been connected with it when the services were conducted a small church in Durham street. The deceased had carried on business as a fruiterer at 76 Main street for 32 years. There are left to mourn their loss four sons and three daughters, 34 grandchildren, 11 great grandchildren. Two grandsons are on active service, and one has returned. The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, the remains being interred in the New Cemetery; the funeral being very largely attended. The coffin-bearers were Messrs Wm Johnson, E. Carney, J. Roberts, and W. Bradby. The pallbearers were Messrs J. Parnell, (son-in-law), R. Warren, W. Feary, J. Bennett, J. Davis, A. Davis, W. Rowe, R. Rankin, N. Jones. The Rev. Adam Clarke, Town and City Missioner, conducted the services at the house and grave. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Hugh Evans and Son, of Ballarat East and Egerton.[3]

See also

Ballaarat New Cemetery

Women of Eureka

Further Reading

Dorothy Wickham, Women in 'Ballarat' 1851-1871: A Case Study in Agency, PhD. School of Behavioural and Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Ballarat, March 2008.

Dorothy Wickham, Blood, Sweat and Tears: Women of Eureka in Journal of Australian Colonial History, 10, No, 1, 2008, pp. 99-115.

Dorothy Wickham, Women of the Diggings: Ballarat 1854, BHSPublishing, 2009.

http://www.eurekapedia.org/Blood,_Sweat_and_Tears:_Women_at_Eureka

Clare Wright, The Forgotten Rebels of Eureka, Text Publishing, 2013.

Dorothy Wickham, Not just a Pretty Face: Women on the Goldfields, in Pay Dirt: Ballarat & Other Gold Towns, BHSPublishing, 2019, pp. 25-36.

References

  1. The Argus, 19 July 1918.
  2. The Argus, 19 July 1918.
  3. Ballarat Evening Echo, 19 July 1918.

External links



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Caption, Reference.