Difference between revisions of "Ships"

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IMMIGRATION
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The National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia, in their exhibition called ''PASSAGES'' brought alive the experience of sea journeys, from the convict era to the modern story of Australia's refugees. Exhibits included diary excerpts, recorded memories, clothing, precious mementos, shipboard souvenirs, and cultural baggage, all avenues by which family historians can trace the voyages undertaken by their ancestors. The exhibits at the Museum explored the various reasons for leaving a homeland, the perils (and pleasures) of the voyage, attachments to home, and the challenges of settling in a new country. In the age of the sailing ship the voyage from Europe to Australia was long, uncomfortable and often boring.
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For those who chose to make the journey by steerage, accommodation was dark, damp and uncomfortable. Relics from the wreck of the ''Dunbar'' (1857) are poignant reminders of the dangers of sea travel. The stretches of ocean and long ship journeys were measured in days, weeks and sometimes months. For those on board, it was usually the longest and most significant journey of their lives.
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The following people associated with the [[Eureka Stockade]], or [[Ballarat]] in 1854, sailed on the following ships.
 
The following people associated with the [[Eureka Stockade]], or [[Ballarat]] in 1854, sailed on the following ships.
  

Revision as of 10:53, 11 July 2016

IMMIGRATION

The National Maritime Museum in Sydney, Australia, in their exhibition called PASSAGES brought alive the experience of sea journeys, from the convict era to the modern story of Australia's refugees. Exhibits included diary excerpts, recorded memories, clothing, precious mementos, shipboard souvenirs, and cultural baggage, all avenues by which family historians can trace the voyages undertaken by their ancestors. The exhibits at the Museum explored the various reasons for leaving a homeland, the perils (and pleasures) of the voyage, attachments to home, and the challenges of settling in a new country. In the age of the sailing ship the voyage from Europe to Australia was long, uncomfortable and often boring.

For those who chose to make the journey by steerage, accommodation was dark, damp and uncomfortable. Relics from the wreck of the Dunbar (1857) are poignant reminders of the dangers of sea travel. The stretches of ocean and long ship journeys were measured in days, weeks and sometimes months. For those on board, it was usually the longest and most significant journey of their lives.

The following people associated with the Eureka Stockade, or Ballarat in 1854, sailed on the following ships.

Abysinnia

The Adelaide

The Australia

Aberfoyle

Arabia

Araminta

Arion

Bavaria

Beamah

Ben Nevis

Bloomer

Blorenge

Blue Jacket

Brankimmor

British Queen

Calcutta

Calista

Camperdown

Carpentaria

Caroline

Chalmers

Columbus

Countess of Elgin

David Clarke

Diadem

Don Juan

Duke of Richmond

Eliza

Ellen

Emma Eugenia

Empress Eugenie

Fanny

Faugh-a-ballagh

Flora

Gambia

Harpley

Hibernian

Hooghly

Hurricane

James T. Foord

Lady Arabella

Lady Emma

Lady Fitzherbert

Lady Flora

Lady Northumberland

Larpent

Lightening

London

Lord Hungerford

Lucia Maria

Magnolia

Malvina

Mangerton

Marco Polo

Marlborough

Marquis of Hastings

Marshall Bennett

Medway

Miles Barton

Mobile

Phoenix

Ratcliffe

Regulus

Rip Van Winkle

Sarah & Anne

Scindian

Sesostris

Sir Walter Scott

Sir William Money

Star of the East

St Vincent

Shusan

Tasmania

The Herald

Thetis

Ticonderoga

United Kingdom

Vernon

Victory

Wanata

Wellington

Wilhelmsburg

William Money

William Sharples