Difference between revisions of "Military Musket"

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== References ==
 
== References ==
 
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== External Links ==
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https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/207477074?q=%22Eureka+Stockade%22&c=picture&versionId=248043847

Revision as of 06:26, 30 November 2019

Military on the Victorian goldfield in 1854 carried the Lovell's 1842 Pattern smooth bore muzzle-loading musket. It had a percussion cap ignition. To fire a muzzle loading weapon a cartridge would be taken from the cartridge pouch that hung from a soldiers cross-belt. The cartridge was a paper tube holding a measure of blackpowder and a lead bullet. Wax or grease was used to seal and waterproof the cartridge. When loading the musket the cartridge was put between the teeth to tear off the opposite end to the ball. With the but of the musket resting on the ground black powder would be inserted into the muzzle with the paper on top to act as wadding. The bullet was then inserted, and along with the paper it was rammed down s a , Australian Military History Publications, 2009, p.214.</ref>

The Melbourne Museum has a British Service percussion musket, Pattern 1842 Musket, cal. .753 in., steel smoothbore round barrel, 992 mm long, with Lovell's bayonet catch on R.H. side. It was issued to the 40th Foot (2nd Somersetshire Regiment), an infantry regiment of the British Army stationed in Victoria from 1852 to 1860, used these guns in the attack on Eureka Stockade, Ballarat on 3 December 1854.[1]

References


External Links

https://trove.nla.gov.au/work/207477074?q=%22Eureka+Stockade%22&c=picture&versionId=248043847