Difference between revisions of "Anastasia Hayes"

From eurekapedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(Goldfields Involvement, 1854)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
[[File:Anastasia Hayes.jpeg|805px|thumb|right|''Anastasia Hayes, A Eureka Heroine''. Australian Town and Country Journal, 18 June 1892]]
 
[[File:Anastasia Hayes.jpeg|805px|thumb|right|''Anastasia Hayes, A Eureka Heroine''. Australian Town and Country Journal, 18 June 1892]]
[[File:St-Alipius.jpeg|805px|thumb|right|''Katholisch Kapelle aus den Gravel Pit Lunis 3u Ballarat Januav 1854 by William Strutt.  State Library of Victoria Collection (H12532)]]
+
[[File:St-Alipius.jpeg|805px|thumb|right|''Katholisch Kapelle aus den Gravel Pit Lunis 3u Ballarat Januav 1854 by Eugene von Guerard.  State Library of Victoria Collection (H12532)]]
 
==Background==
 
==Background==
  

Revision as of 23:45, 21 October 2019

Anastasia Hayes, A Eureka Heroine. Australian Town and Country Journal, 18 June 1892
Katholisch Kapelle aus den Gravel Pit Lunis 3u Ballarat Januav 1854 by Eugene von Guerard. State Library of Victoria Collection (H12532)

Background

Born Anastasia Butler in 1817 at Castle, County Kilkenny, Ireland, her parents were Richard Butler and Ellen Baron. Surviving the Irish potato famine[1] Anastasia married Timothy Hayes.[2]. Anastasia and Timothy Hayes and their five children arrived at Melbourne on 05 October 1852 on the Mobile.

Anastasia and Timothy Hayes lived close the the Eureka Diggings. The site of their tent was in King Street close to Victoria Street. [3]

She died at her son's residence at Ballarat on 06 April 1892, aged 74 years. [4]

Goldfields Involvement, 1854

Anastasia Hayes was a teacher at the St Alipius Catholic Primary School in 1854.[5]

Unknown maker (Australia), The flag of the Southern Cross (Eureka Flag), 1854, wool, cotton.
Art Gallery of Ballarat Collection. Gift of the King family, 2001

It is claimed that Anastasia Withers helped to sew the Eureka Flag.[6]

After the battle Anastasia Hayes rushed to the Stockade to search for her husband, Timothy Hayes. She found him arrested by the Military and rushed up to speak to him and his captors. Talking to Lieutenant Richards she asked "Why did you not come yesterday?" Richards made no reply and she then said "if I had been a man I would not have allowed myself to be taken by the likes of you."[7]

Anastasia closely attended Peter Lalor when his arm was amputated at Fr Patrick Smyth's residence, and threw the arm down a shaft. The arm was supposedly later recovered for burial by Johannes Gregorius.[8]


THE woman who assisted Father Smith at the amputation of Peter Lalor's arm was Mrs Timothy Hayes, the first, school teacher at Ballarat. She was an eye-witness of the riot, and wife of Timothy Hayes, one of the six men arrested and charged with high treason. These men were sentenced In death and subsequently reprieved.
IDA GARDNER. Moore Street. Hawthorn.[9]

Post 1854 Experiences

After Anastasia’s death, the following was published: Afterwards I saw many of the wounded, and I did all that lay in my power to alleviate their sufferings. The sight was one that touched me very much and I shall never forget it. Many of the poor fellows were besmeared with blood and writhing in agony from some wound.[10]

Headstone for Anastasia Hayes

She continued to work as a teacher at St Alipius School. After Timothy Hayes was acquited of Treason he left Anastasia to bring up their six chiledren alone.[11]

Obituary

Anastasia Hayes of 22 King st (?) which took place yesterday at her residence. The deceased lady who was 74 years of age and been ill for some weeks and died peacefully shortly before noon. Although her system had been gradually breaking for years, she retained her mental powers almost to the last and until very shortly before her death was closely observant to all that was going on around her. Mrs. Hayes took a prominent part in the most stirring times conducted with the history of Ballarat, having resided here since 1852, in October of which year she arrived in Port Phillip with her husband and 5 children. Early in 1853 she was appointed by the late Dean Dowling to the charge of the Roman Catholic school he was then establishing on the site where St Alipius church now stands. It was while Mrs Hayes held this position that the exciting events that culminated in the Eureka Stockade took place and the deceased lady was acquainted with the leaders of that movement. On the morning of the 3rd December she encountered the troops returning for the storming of the stockade and seeing her husband handcuffed between two horseman, she, at great personal risk, reached his side and forcibly remonstrated with his captors. After the commital of Mr Hayes in connection with the outbreak, although having the care of a young family, the now deceased lady attended closely on the wounded leader of the diggers and was present and assisted at the amputation of his arm, afterwards, in company with Mr McGrath, the schoolmaster, disposing of the dismembered limb in an abandoned shaft at the rear of where St Paul's Parsonage now stands. She leaves 2 sons - Mr E. Hayes of King St and Mr T. Hayes of the Victorian Railway. [12]


Mrs Hayes a very old resident of Ballarat East, and one of the few of her sex who was an active participate in the events connected with the memorable Eureka Stockade died at her sons residence to-day. Mrs Hayes was present in the tent after the fight when Mr Peter Lalor who afterwards for so many years represented Grant in the Legislative Assembly and rose to the position of Speaker, had his arm amputated, and it was she who wrapped the severed limb in a piece of sacking and threw it down an abandoned shaft where it should be beyond discovery. Her son Captain Hayes, is reader on the Ballarat Courier. [13]


The death is announced of Mrs. Hayes, a very old resident of Ballarat (Vic.), and one of the few women who actively participated in the events connected with the Eureka Stockade.[14]


The Late Mrs. Hayes
A EUREKA STOCKADE HEROINE
The accompanying portrait is that of a very old and respected resident of Ballarat, who died at the age of 74 years, on April 7. Mrs. Hayes arrived in Port Phillip with her husband and five children in the ship Mobile in 1852. Early in 1853 the deceased lady was appointed to the charge of the Roman Catholic School then being established on the site of St. Alipius' Church by Dean Downing. Mrs Hayes was in close touch with the events leading up to the Eureka Stockade, and knew most of the leaders of the movement. On the memorable December 3 she encountered the troops, and seeing her husband handcuffed she incurred much danger to reach him, and sternly rebuked his captors. On the committal of her husband for high treason, she attended the wounded leader of the diggers, who was concealed at the Rev. P. Smyth's house, and assisted the doctors to amputate his arm. Of late years Mrs. Hayes was not strong, but her mental vigour continued unabated to the end. She leaves two sons, Mr. E. Hayes, of Ballarat, and Mr. T. Hayes, of the Victorian railways.[15]

See also

Timothy Hayes

Further Reading

Corfield, J.,Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.

References

  1. Gervasoni, Clare and Ford, Tina, Eureka Stockade centre Hall of Debate Kit, 1998.
  2. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  3. The Eureka Trails publicity brochure, undated.
  4. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  5. Gervasoni, Clare and Ford, Tina, Eureka Stockade centre Hall of Debate Kit, 1998.
  6. Corfield, J., Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.
  7. Gervasoni, Clare and Ford, Tina, Eureka Stockade centre Hall of Debate Kit, 1998.
  8. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  9. Melbourne Herald, 29 NOvember 1946.
  10. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  11. Gervasoni, Clare and Ford, Tina, Eureka Stockade centre Hall of Debate Kit, 1998.
  12. Ballarat Star, 7 April 1892.
  13. Ballarat Courier, 7 April 1892.
  14. Newcastle Morning Herald, 8 April 1892.
  15. Australian Town and Country Journal, 18 June 1892.

External links

http://www.thecourier.com.au/story/582321/family-reflects-on-its-historic-link/