Italy

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Poster
Courtesy Ballarat Heritage Services.

A number of Italian speakers from Northern Italy and the Italian speaking Swiss Canton of Ticino arrived in Australia in search of gold. Many of these immigrants first settled at Jim Crow (Daylesford) where around 10 percent of the population spoke Italian in the late 1950s. Raffaello Carboni was used to translate the message of the Ballarat Reform League to non-English speaking residents of Ballarat. He wrote the only eye-witness account of Eureka.[1]


Joseph Barberis, born Genoa, Savoy[2]

Paul Brentani

Antonio Capuano, born Aversa, Naples[3]

Raffaello Carboni, born Urbino[4]

Gerald Hamilton, born Italy

Antonio Polinelli, born Bergamo, Lombardia[5]

Francesco Rappacioli, born Piacenza

Francis Romeo, born Corsica to Italian parents[6]

Henry Wise, born Italy


Also See

Country of Origin

External Links

http://prov.vic.gov.au/whats-on/exhibitions/eureka-on-trial/perspectives

References

  1. Eureka - A Multicultural Event by Dorothy Wickham and Clare Gervasoni, http://www.ballaratheritage.com.au/articles/nationalities.html, accessed 27 March 2013.
  2. Eureka - A Multicultural Event by Dorothy Wickham and Clare Gervasoni, http://www.ballaratheritage.com.au/articles/nationalities.html, accessed 27 March 2013.
  3. Eureka - A Multicultural Event by Dorothy Wickham and Clare Gervasoni, http://www.ballaratheritage.com.au/articles/nationalities.html, accessed 27 March 2013.
  4. Eureka - A Multicultural Event by Dorothy Wickham and Clare Gervasoni, http://www.ballaratheritage.com.au/articles/nationalities.html, accessed 27 March 2013.
  5. Eureka - A Multicultural Event by Dorothy Wickham and Clare Gervasoni, http://www.ballaratheritage.com.au/articles/nationalities.html, accessed 27 March 2013.
  6. Eureka - A Multicultural Event by Dorothy Wickham and Clare Gervasoni, http://www.ballaratheritage.com.au/articles/nationalities.html, accessed 27 March 2013.

Citation Details: Gervasoni, Clare, ‘Italy', Eurekapedia, http://eurekapedia.org, accessed [insert date]