Alfred Crowe

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Background

Crowe was born in Scotland in 1823, the son of James Crowe and Mary Harriet (Meade)[1] He was involved with Chartism and strong supporter of J.B. Humffray and moral force, being a member of his moral force movement.[2] Crowe married Jessie Miller and they had eleven children. [3] Alfred Crowe died on 4 April 1907 [4] and was buried at the Ballaarat New Cemetery on 6 April 1907 (B4 11). [5]

Goldfields Involvement, 1854

Samuel Thomas Gill, Ballaarat Flat, from the Black Hill - 1855, lithograph on paper.
Art Gallery of Ballarat, Ronald Wrigley Estate, 1979.

Crowe was wounded in the Eureka battle, and later died as a result of his wounds. Crowe was said to have witnessed the killing of two Italians who had not taken any part in the Eureka proceedings.[6]

Alfred W. Crowe was on of the moral force party, and a strong supporter of J.B. Humffray. He wrote in his diary:

Charles A. Doudiet, The Old Tent - BALLARAT (Specimen Hill (Tents), circa 1854, watercolour, pen and ink on paper.
Courtesy Art Gallery of Ballarat, purchased by the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery with the assistance of many donors, 1996.
This morning (December 3rd) at daybreak I was awakened by a heavy roll of musketry. Half-dressed, I ran to the top of Specimen Hill. A heavy cloud of smoke rested over the Stockade, through which could be seen the constant flashing of firearms, and the whirr of volley from the troops could be heard. My first impression was that it was an attack by the Stockaders on the troops expected from Melbourne. As daylight increased the redcoats became visible at the back of the Stockade. Troopers were riding and dashing in every direction at headlong speed, and occasionally shots showed that the work of slaughter had not yet ceased. I walked to the site of the notorious Eureka Hotel, where I could distinctly see the proceeding. The troopers still continued chasing the unfortunate wretches who showed themselves, and mercy was not much though of if they attempted to save themselves by flight. A crowd of prisoners were huddled together, surrounded by the military, and several drays were there for carrying away the wounded. the troopers slowly march back to the camp, taking the wounded and prisoners with them. Every point that commanded a view of the proceedings were taken advantage of by a large number of spectators. Hundreds lined the sides of Black Hill. It would have been an interesting sight were it not for the awful sacrifice of life, which had taken place on that lovely Sabbath morn. [7]

Post 1854 Experiences

After the Eureka Stockade Alfred Crowe worked as a teacher and lived in Windermere Street, Ballarat.[8]

Alfred Crowe was acknowledged in the preface of From Tent to Parliament: The Life of Peter Lalor and His Coadjutors for references used from his diary. [9]

See also

Chartism

Further Reading

Corfield, J.,Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.


References

  1. Corfield, J.,Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.
  2. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  3. Corfield, J.,Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.
  4. Corfield, J.,Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.
  5. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  6. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.
  7. From Tent To Parliament, Berry Anderson & Co., Ballarat.
  8. Corfield, J.,Wickham, D., & Gervasoni, C. The Eureka Encyclopaedia, Ballarat Heritage Services, 2004.
  9. Wickham, D., Gervasoni, C. & Phillipson, W., Eureka Research Directory, Ballarat Heritage Services, 1999.

External links